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Rain dance might help


It’s hot, very hot. You don’t require a degree in meteorology to know conditions in Jefferson County are tinder box-dry

Just how dry is it? April, May and June were the driest spring months on record in Arkansas. Rainfall was 50 percent below average in many areas of the state.

The Arkansas Forestry Commission plans on asking the General Assembly to increase its budget by about $1.9 million next year so it can restore 20 positions, including 13 firefighters. With a high fire danger, there are fewer commission employees to send around the state to relieve firefighters who need a break.

The additional funds would also be allocated for the use of planes contracted by the commission to fight wildfires.

Gardens, shrubs and trees that were planted before Mother Nature turned off the precipitation are sledding leaves and blooms earlier than normal.

Individuals and firms that install in-ground sprinkling systems are finding they are as much in demand as air conditioning repairmen. There is an alternative if we don’t see precipitation soon: Native Americans have many different types of ceremonial dances, which vary from tribe to tribe, with the rain dance the most stereotypical Native American ceremonial dance depicted by Hollywood and television.

Some swear by the rain dance.

The English enlisted the help of American Indians to get Mother Nature to cooperate. Last week British officials, worried about notoriously rain-prone London, called on the Yellow Bird Indian Dancers of Arizona and asked them to perform a traditional dance to “appeal to the creator to hold back the rain.”

British Airways flew the tribal dancers to London to help the city stay dry during the Olympics.

So far, the weather has been as perfect as any reasonable person could hope for in typically wet England, we are told.