White Hall Willing Workers discuss stress management


The White Hall Willing Workers met recently at the White Hall Public Library.

President Cheri Aronowitz welcomed members present and opened the meeting. She read the Thought for the Month: Stress is the trash of modern life. We all generate it, but if you don’t dispose of it properly, it will pile up and overtake your life! She also read the handy hint: To relieve stress, stop, relax and take a deep breath. Then think about it. The inspiration for the month was given by Sue Medlock from Psalms 69:1 — Save me, O God, for the waters have come up to my neck.

Roll call was presented to the question: “How do you manage stress in your daily life?”

The program was presented by Aronowitz on Managing Stress. She started out the program with “Death is nature’s way of telling us to slow down.” Everyone experiences stress in their life — some big and some small. Everyone has experienced many kinds of stress in the last few years. These include storms, wars with all the challenges of deployments and separations and, also economic problems including lost jobs, and tight budgets. Theodore Roosevelt said, “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.

The old idea about stress was that certain events led to certain amounts of stress. It was assumed that events like the death of a family member, an illness, or being fired from a job would be very stressful for all people. The new idea is that people who suffered from very similar events showed different levels of stress. Reuben Hill, a family scientist, suggested that it was not the events that led to stress; rather the events, together with our resources and interpretation of the event that determined the level of stress experienced. This means that we are not the helpless victims of life. We can rally resources. Some of those resources are helpful friends and family, hobbies, faith, a loving pet, mentors or counselors. Think of challenges as well disguised blessings. Challenges can help us draw closer to people, develop greater compassion, and learn to value the simple things in life. Challenges help us grow. The surprising conclusion about stress is that it always invites and often forces us to grow.

During the business segment of the meeting the following reports were given:

Community Service: Peggie Barbaree reported on Kidfest at White Hall Park on April 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Relay for Life will be held on May 4 at Watson Chapel field house from 6 to 10 p.m. We will sell baked goods. The AEHC Spring Council will be held on May 1 at the Extension Office. Registration will begin at 9:30.

A club workshop was held on March 31 to make aprons. Another club workshop will be held on April 28 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at Peggie’s home. We will make a fabric note organizer.

Education: Jo Ann Carr reported that there will be a county workshop on the Jefferson County Extension Office from 9 a.m. to noon on April 19. The workshop will be a miscellaneous craft workshop. There will be four or five different crafts being presented. The County Fellowship tour of the Capitol and Governor’s Mansion will be on May 24. There was a club tour to Miller’s Mud Mill in Dumas on April 13.

Catherine Atkinson took 10 more wreaths to White Hall Nursing Home and there is now a wreath on every door.

Dates to remember:

• Trip to Lake Village to tour the Catholic Church and museum on Lake Shore; Drive in Lake Village and shopping at Paul Michaels on April 16

• County workshop at the Extension Office on April 19 from 9 a.m. to noon

• Kidfest at White Hall City Park on April 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

• Club workshop at Peggie Barbaree’s on April 28

• Spring Council at the Extension Office. This will be potluck and registration starts at 9:30 a.m.

Other members present were Patsy Glover, Sarah Hester, Dee Kendrick, Sarah Payton and Marnette Reed.

Refreshments were provided by Catherine Atkinson and JoAnn Carr.

Those interested in learning more about Extension Homemakers, please call any member or the Extension Office at 870-534-1033.