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Sitting Bull still instructs us

As many inspirational leaders often have, the leader of the Hunkpapa Lakota tribe and (eventually) the entire Sioux Nation, Sitting Bull, gave his life in furtherance of human rights for his people. Sitting Bull earned his name because of his reputation as a courageous warrior — who, like a bison bull, would dig in and fight rather than flee.

Here’s some good news: schools connected

Ready for some good news? Do you remember a few years ago when Arkansas’ public schools had inadequate internet connections, and there was a big controversy, and it seemed like this was going to be another one of those huge political fights requiring a lot of taxpayer dollars?

Legislators codify diligent discrimination

Almost every day the theocratic dullards holding the wheel of Arkansas state government prove they are out of step with both mainstream America and modern Christian values. Even so, Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s minion continually embarrass and retard the Natural State’s place in our great nation.

Spend less to tax less

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is pushing an idea: Cut spending first and then cut taxes. It’s so crazy it just might work, which is why he wants to try it in Arkansas and why, hopefully, someone will try it in Washington, D.C.

Spend less to tax less

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is pushing an idea: Cut spending first and then cut taxes. It’s so crazy it just might work, which is why he wants to try it in Arkansas and why, hopefully, someone will try it in Washington, D.C.

Legislators codify diligent discrimination

Almost every day the theocratic dullards holding the wheel of Arkansas state government prove they are out of step with both mainstream America and modern Christian values. Even so, Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s minion continually embarrass and retard the Natural State’s place in our great nation.

Black Demands and White Fears

The June 10, 1966, cover of Life magazine is a gauge of how much America has changed — and how much it hasn’t. It featured a photo of Elizabeth Taylor from her movie “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” — which it described as a “shocker” that “shatters the rules of censorship.” Today the film wouldn’t shock a fifth-grader.

In memory of Ray Thornton

The night before Ray Thornton of Arkansas died I was reading a biography of Adlai Stevenson of Illinois. And making notes about Adlai and Arkansas (the connections abundant and well-known) and what he would make of today’s politics. (That column, coming soon). The book was on my desk in the morning when on my computer screen appeared the first word of Thornton’s death. The physical resemblance the two men shared — nose, eyes, the hairline (or absence of one) — amused rather than startled.

Why it’s too late to scrap the Iran deal

To most Republicans, the three scariest words in the English language, after “Ruth Bader Ginsburg,” are “Iran nuclear deal.” The GOP presidential candidates are so intent on putting distance between them and it that you’d think the document was printed on radioactive paper.

Population number bear reflection

A recent story published in The Commercial details one of the most serious issues facing the people of Pine Bluff and Jefferson County: population loss. The county and city have been in decline for almost three decades. Peaking at just over 57,000 in 1970 (and hovering there until 1990) the region has seen one of the most precipitous population slides in the nation.

A century of bunkshooting fear

Recently, the evangelist Franklin Graham held a prayer rally at the Arkansas State Capitol where he urged citizens to vote for Christian candidates who support “biblical principles.” During his speech, he railed against what he characterized as the “growth of secularism.”

Steering the national will

One hundred-fifty years ago this week, Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth mortally wounded U. S. Pres. Abraham Lincoln in Ford’s Theater at Washington, DC. History well records the sequence of events: Booth’s furtive move into Lincoln’s private theater box; the fatal shot to the back of the head; the assassin’s leg-breaking leap to the stage and his infamous cry of “sic semper tyrannis!”