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Opinion

On Trade, Trump Is an Encyclopedia of Error

Donald Trump is not a professor, but for years he will be yielding insights to every student of economics. His Tuesday address on trade did a masterful job of combining antiquated fallacies with misinformation and ignorance to create an encyclopedia of error. Instructors have never had so much free help constructing their lesson plans.

Colors

A new poll of Arkansas voters by the Talk Business/Hendrix College partnership indicates our former First Lady, of Arkansas and the U.S., is most definitely not first in our collective esteem. Were the presidential election to be held today Hillary Clinton would lose Arkansas to Donald Trump by eleven — that is 1-1 — points.

The ditch–the final chapter

I’ve been overwhelmed by the almost 60 wonderful e-mails I’ve received on my piece, “The Ditch.” So many of these offered hope I’d find my old friends, Glodene and Doll Baby. I am delighted to tell you I have and I can now give you “the rest of the story.”

Applauding mayor’s Animal Control veto

Continuing its march of distraction, the issue of removing Pine Bluff Animal Control from the supervision of the Police Department has taken yet another turn. Showing the wisdom and judgment that got her elected in the first place, Pine Bluff Mayor Debe Hollingsworth vetoed a proposal to separate the two entities.

Strong evidence against capital punishment

Just this week Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge was almost gleeful in stating her intent to set execution dates for several inmates on the state’s death row. I worry about people who think capital punishment represents the great pinnacle of justice. Given her demonstrated proclivities to shill for all manner other ultra-conservative, anti-science and anti-environmental causes, the fact that she champions an ineffectual and draconian punishment philosophy is nauseatingly predictable. At least she’s consistent.

Justice and Freddie Gray

Local prosecutors, being elected to office, are subject to the rule of the people. Their decisions, however, are not — or at least they shouldn’t be. Any state’s attorney or district attorney worthy of the office gives public opinion about particular cases exactly the weight it deserves: zero.

Fiddling around, ignoring problems

You know the story about Nero fiddling while Rome burned? It didn’t actually happen, but it illustrates a point about leaders crazily ignoring a problem. These days, no illustration is needed. The government’s largest programs, Social Security and Medicare, are not burning up, but their problems are being ignored.

School changed by two sisters and a cup of coffee

Pea Ridge High School senior Tyler Cope, 17, was a waitress. Now, she’s a certified nursing assistant making $11 an hour. More importantly, she’s well on her way to a good-paying future in nursing. Thirty of her fellow students also have CNA licenses, while others are learning skills in other career fields. And it all happened partly because of two sisters and a cup of coffee.

Long march to Flag Day

While it doesn’t get the attention that many national holidays receive, today is Flag Day, a celebration of the stars and stripes. Like so many American holidays, Flag Day began as a small local observance and grew to nationwide acclaim. As with many American holidays, there’s also a bit of controversy as to which community should be given credit for being first.

Reporting from the front

“We leave the Rosebud tomorrow and by the time this reaches you we will have met and fought the red devils, with what result remains to be seen.” These lines were written by famed 19th century journalist, Marcus Kellogg, as he travelled to the site of Little Big Horn with U. S. General George Armstrong Custer. The words would prove to be among Kellogg’s last as he along with 260 cavalrymen were massacred by an overwhelming number of Sioux and Cheyenne warriors just four days later.

Camels, oranges and charity

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about charity. Specifically, I’ve taken note of recent news stories where certain wealthy individuals of my acquaintance have been lauded for their charitable donations. While their philanthropy is indeed laudable, I can’t help but focus on the fact that their charity is funded in large measure through business practices that I believe to be unethical, destructive to the community and, frankly, immoral.

Camels, oranges and charity

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about charity. Specifically, I’ve taken note of recent news stories where certain wealthy individuals of my acquaintance have been lauded for their charitable donations. While their philanthropy is indeed laudable, I can’t help but focus on the fact that their charity is funded in large measure through business practices that I believe to be unethical, destructive to the community and, frankly, immoral.

Camels, oranges and charity

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about charity. Specifically, I’ve taken note of recent news stories where certain wealthy individuals of my acquaintance have been lauded for their charitable donations. While their philanthropy is indeed laudable, I can’t help but focus on the fact that their charity is funded in large measure through business practices that I believe to be unethical, destructive to the community and, frankly, immoral.