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Passing of a fashion icon

Oscar de la Renta, the world renown fashion designer, died this week at age 82. His clientele included Hollywood legends, First ladies and global royalty. He first gained wide exposure in the United States as one of the courtiers who dressed Jacqueline Kennedy.

Great wrong set right

As reported Thursday by the Arkansas News Bureau, the Arkansas Supreme Court on Wednesday unanimously struck down Act 595 of 2013, which required voters to show photo identification before being allowed to cast their ballots. While the Justices were unified in their decision, there was a division with regard to their predicate reasoning.

Signal Internet innovation anniversary

Twenty years ago this week, the Internet took a giant leap toward broad public use. Back in 1994, two technology pioneers, Jim Clark and Marc Andreessen, of Mosaic Communication Corporation released an innovative new way to access online information. Their brainchild was called Netscape Network Navigator.

Courts correcting election carnival

Last week the United States Supreme Court blocked officials in Wisconsin from enforcement of that state’s voter identification law. Under this measure, voters would have been required to show photo identification before casting their ballots in the coming November election.

Watson’s resistance is laudable

It’s an issue that local policymakers confront regularly —- the law has gotten in the way of their ill-conceived designs. In this particular instance, Pine Bluff School District Superintendent Linda Watson stands as the last buttress against a legally questionable action relating to additional pay for Pine Bluff High School Principal Michael Nellums.

Charity tougher than enamel

Forty years ago today, German businessman Oskar Schindler died at age 66. Schindler is best remembered for his role in saving 1,200 Jews from deportation to Auschwitz, Nazi Germany’s largest concentration camp. Schindler’s story was commemorated in the 1993 Academy Award-winning film, Schindler’s List.

Tragic catalyst for safety

In 1941, President Franklin Roosevelt gave an address to Congress now known as the “Four Freedoms” speech. In it he enumerated a set of inalienable human rights. He discussed: freedom of expression; freedom of religion; freedom from want; and the fourth freedom — freedom from fear.

Near Soviet curriculum in Colorado

Score one for opponents of the thought police. After two weeks of public outrage, demonstrations and statewide backlash, the school board of Jefferson County, Colorado has relented on its plan to conservatively sanitize its advanced placement U.S. history classes. The proposal was offered by Julie Williams one of three newly elected ultra-conservative board members.

Getting real about pensions

Slowly but surely, reality is taking hold in the debate over the massive liabilities state and local governments have accumulated for their workers’ pensions and other benefits. For years, governments routinely inflated estimated pension-fund investment returns to make them seem better-funded than they are, but two years ago the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, an authoritative nonprofit organization, issued guidance intended to curb that tendency.

Solving the border crisis

This country benefits from a healthy, legal flow of fresh talent and energy from all over the world. For that, a comprehensive reform of U.S. immigration laws, including a path to legalized status for those already here illegally, is essential.

Summer heat fifty years long

This Saturday marks a the 50th anniversary of a dark day in America’s march for racial equality. On June 21, 1964 three civil rights workers, Andrew Goodwin, Michael Schwerner and James Chaney were murdered as they investigated the burning of a Mississippi church. There story is well known, but there are many more stories from the period dubbed Freedom Summer that should be retold.

America’s oddest rancher

Eccentricity and personal tumult often accompany artistic talent. Such was certainly the case with Stanley Marsh, a Texas millionaire whose partially buried row of Cadillacs became a cultural phenomenon in the 1970s. Marsh died this Tuesday at Lubbock, TX. He was 76.

A smarter way

It’s an election year, and Democrats are loudly decrying the cost of higher education and demanding that the government spend more to cut student debt. The Senate on last Wednesday rejected one of their less-sensible ideas. But there are better ones that lawmakers should embrace.

Warming cold educational waters

As recently reported in The Commercial, the state Board of Education voted unanimously Thursday to return the Dollarway School District to local control after two years of state control. We are heartened by this news. We hope it signals a new era of progressive leadership and higher teaching standards in the district.

Pater familias in the ideal

If one were making an ideal father, what would he be? Hallmark has dozens of ready-made tropes into which we might cast our perfect father: hunter; fisherman; golfer; griller; sports fan; car nut and Barcalounger captain. While these make for fine greeting cards, they don’t get to the essence of fathering.

Building bridges, tearing down walls

In a recent editorial we reflected on the life and career of John Wayne. The editorial noted both Wayne’s importance in film and as an advocate for conservative political causes. Today also marks a significant anniversary for another conservative icon. On this day in 1987, President Ronald Reagan delivered an address to the people of Germany in which he admonished Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down” the infamous Berlin Wall.

Marion, Sandy and the Duke

Few people in this world live up to their own legend. This is especially true in the case of movie stars. Once in a great while that happens. It certainly seems to have happened with ruggedly handsome, tough guy, John Wayne.