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Editorials

Illogical governing

Whatever its merits or shortcomings, a federal judge’s decision last week blocking the Obama administration’s immigration policy offered congressional Republicans an escape path from the corner into which they had painted themselves by imperiling funding for the Department of Homeland Security and its 240,000 employees. Thus far they have not shown the wisdom to accept this gift.

More than crumbling buildings

If you ever wondered why people have left Pine Bluff, all you needed to do was attend the recent emergency city council meeting on Monday. At that meeting council members were confronted with the specter of an imminent catastrophe and chose to do nothing. It was a shameful display of myopic lunacy. If they are racing toward oblivion, they are making good headway.

Reason prevails in Senate committee, not Gov.’s office

While the current manifestation of the Arkansas legislature has been more miss than hit, reason prevailed this past Wednesday as the Senate Judiciary Committee declined to refer House Bill 1228, the so-called Conscience Protection Act, to the full Senate. The bill, authored by Rep. Bob Ballinger, R-Hindsville, would have prohibited the state from interceding in matters of conscience due to a person’s religious beliefs unless the state has a substantial interest in doing so, and does so by the least restrictive means possible.

Do you believe in miracles?

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Olympic hockey team’s surprise victory over the global Leviathan of hockey, the Soviet Union. The triumph is often called “the Miracle on Ice.” As modern “miracles” sometimes do, a great mythology has grown up around this storied game.

The day the music died

Symphony orchestras all across America are struggling both financially and in terms of relevancy. American appetites for cultural products have changed over the last 20 years. One of the more notable casualties has been a precipitous decline in live orchestral music. While orchestras, such as the now closing Pine Bluff Symphony Orchestra, are reeling from the sting of it all, they are hardly alone.

Of creed deed and discontent

One hundred years ago a small group of German intellectuals formed a group in response to their nation’s aggressive campaign of invasion and annexation. Dubbed the Bund Neues Vaterland (New Fatherland League), the organization was headed by physician, Georg Nicolai.

Bang bang boogie remembered

With the now famous refrain, “I said a hip hop, hippie to the hippie, the hip, hip a hop, and you don’t stop, a rock it, to the bang bang boogie, say, up jump the boogie, to the rhythm of the boogie, the beat…” hip hop music leapt out of inner city enclaves and into suburban America. The year was 1979. The track was a 14-minute-long opus titled “Rapper’s Delight.”

Dreams, tears and new lives

On its website, the National Park Service introduces Ellis Island with the phrase, “Island of Hope, Island of Tears.” From 1892 to 1924, Ellis Island, located off the southern tip of Manhattan Island, was the United States’ largest and most active immigration station, where over 12 million immigrants were processed.

Careful what you want

The election held Tuesday is arguably the greatest post-Reconstruction moment in the history of the Arkansas Republican party. With almost every constitutional office either filled by or awaiting a Republican incumbent, it is important to take stock of what this election is, what it isn’t and what their newfound mantle requires.

Five hundred years and counting

Earlier this fall, the Palo Alto Longevity Prize was inaugurated by physician, life-enhancing advocate, and hedge fund manager Joon Yun. The goal of the contest is largely the same as Ponce de Leon’s expeditions during the sixteenth century: finding the fountain of youth. Of course the Palo Alto Prize is couched in modern medicine, not magic-infused waters, but the promise of it remains the same.

One crisis begets another

On this day 35 years ago, hundreds of Iranian students stormed the United States embassy in Tehran and in the process took more than 60 Americans hostage. Apart from the abject horror of the immediate crisis, these events would effectively seal the fate of beleaguered U.S. President Jimmy Carter.