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Like Mike

In the 1990’s, Michael Jordan was a hero of the NBA and a pop culture icon. A recurring theme in Gatorade ads at the time featured people singing about how they wanted to “be like Mike.”

What should be done about Lidia?

When leaders of eight Arkansas higher learning institutions sent a letter to Congress recently calling for immigration reform, among their arguments was that undocumented students brought to America as children struggle to access college — a waste of their talents, both for them and for society.

Voter fraud is a fraud

Hardly anyone noticed last spring when Jon Husted, the Republican Secretary of State in Ohio, issued a report on the 2012 election. Out of 5.63 million ballots cast in that state, he identified 135 possible cases of voter fraud.

When will the madness end?

Who knows when this madness will end. Perhaps by the time these words reach print we will have been delivered of the latest psychotic episode — the absurd shuttering of some federal government bureaus and offices. Dangerous shenanigans, and a national embarrassment. And still to come is the debt ceiling debate.

Uncle Sam can't refuse to pay bills

As this column is being written, the government is shut down, which is bad, but temporary. The bigger debate is over raising the debt limit, which will be reached on about Oct. 17. The consequences of failing to increase it would be permanent, would cost taxpayers trillions of dollars, and would benefit mostly the foreign creditors who loan our government money.

The real meaning of the 'Redskins' debate

As a general rule, the names of professional sports teams, and their connotations, are of little concern. No one cares that the Chicago White Sox don’t wear white socks, or that Utah, where the NBA’s Jazz are based, is the last place you’d think of when you think of jazz.

Obamacare is here for now

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare — has dominated the political conversation for the last five years since the legislation was introduced in 2009. Now, at long last, key parts of it are here, but for how long may depend on factors outside either political party’s control.

Auditors cite lack of available records in UA report

One of the most disturbing things about the Arkansas Legislative Joint Auditing Committee’s investigative report on the financial practices of the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville Division of University Advancement is that the picture could be even worse except for the lack of records.

Back to the basics

I confess I've been doing some yelling at the TV. I keep hearing that we have to have a "national conversation on violence" in the wake of the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. We're having no such conversation, at least one that means anything, until we confront who we are as a nation today.

Obama and the power of no

In his use of American power and influence abroad, Barack Obama's critics say he has been reluctant, gun-shy and prone to saying one thing and doing another. They're right. They're only wrong in thinking it's a bad thing.

Unlike D.C., state politics offers hope

According to an April opinion poll by the Pew Research Center, while 57 percent of Americans view their state government favorably, only 28 percent feel the same way about the federal government. That's understandable after watching the events of the past few months.

When justice enforces the ‘narrative,’ not the law

Watching the Justice Department under President Obama transform into a dirty weapon of political manipulation to divide Americans into warring camps of class and race is enough to make a citizen feel helpless. I am referring, of course, to the federal government's outrageous reaction to the jury verdict in the George Zimmerman case.

We must not be enemies

As the Senate headed for a showdown this week over a Democratic threat to erode the filibuster rule, a senior Republican was musing about the party leaders he'd known over his long career.

Some aren’t more equal than others

In our recent editorial about the George Zimmerman case we briefly discussed the concept of "due process." As of the Pine Bluff City Council's most recent meeting, we have a much more local situation that further clarifies the matter. In specific, we refer to Alderman Glen Brown's assertion that he had been "targeted" by the city's Inspection and Zoning Department pursuant to the condemnation of a house he owns at 1614 South Lee Street.

Double jeopardy for George Zimmerman?

On Nov. 3, 1979, as members of the Communist Workers Party chanted and sang at a "Death to the Klan" rally in Greensboro, N.C., a group of white men drove up, got out of their cars and began firing at the demonstrators. Five protesters were killed.