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Medical weed: What images do you see?

Unless Arkansas somehow becomes competitive in the presidential race, which it probably won’t, the state’s airwaves won’t be crammed with political advertising by Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Pity our unfortunate fellow Americans in Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida for that one. In Arkansas, the only race between candidates that might be mildly interesting is the one for U.S. Senate between Sen. John Boozman and Conner Eldridge.

Heroes ensnared in bureaucracy

Recently, the local CBS television affiliate, KTHV, broadcast a report about Joe George, a Pearl Harbor survivor and hero of the ill-fated USS Arizona. Through George’s efforts, the lives of six other sailors were saved, but there was a catch. Because a superior officer had ordered George to stop, the hero sailor was never officially recognized by the Navy for his act of bravery.

Traveling Cruz’s higher low road

Political conventions are supposed to be the place where differences are set aside and the party faithful fall in line behind whoever has the proverbial nod. As the Republican party brought its party to a close last week there were still many of the faithful who hadn’t quite taken the medicine. Then there was Sen. Ted Cruz.

Sitting Bull still instructs us

As many inspirational leaders often have, the leader of the Hunkpapa Lakota tribe and (eventually) the entire Sioux Nation, Sitting Bull, gave his life in furtherance of human rights for his people. Sitting Bull earned his name because of his reputation as a courageous warrior — who, like a bison bull, would dig in and fight rather than flee.

Here’s some good news: schools connected

Ready for some good news? Do you remember a few years ago when Arkansas’ public schools had inadequate internet connections, and there was a big controversy, and it seemed like this was going to be another one of those huge political fights requiring a lot of taxpayer dollars?

Legislators codify diligent discrimination

Almost every day the theocratic dullards holding the wheel of Arkansas state government prove they are out of step with both mainstream America and modern Christian values. Even so, Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s minion continually embarrass and retard the Natural State’s place in our great nation.

Spend less to tax less

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is pushing an idea: Cut spending first and then cut taxes. It’s so crazy it just might work, which is why he wants to try it in Arkansas and why, hopefully, someone will try it in Washington, D.C.

Spend less to tax less

Lt. Governor Tim Griffin is pushing an idea: Cut spending first and then cut taxes. It’s so crazy it just might work, which is why he wants to try it in Arkansas and why, hopefully, someone will try it in Washington, D.C.

Legislators codify diligent discrimination

Almost every day the theocratic dullards holding the wheel of Arkansas state government prove they are out of step with both mainstream America and modern Christian values. Even so, Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s minion continually embarrass and retard the Natural State’s place in our great nation.

Black Demands and White Fears

The June 10, 1966, cover of Life magazine is a gauge of how much America has changed — and how much it hasn’t. It featured a photo of Elizabeth Taylor from her movie “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” — which it described as a “shocker” that “shatters the rules of censorship.” Today the film wouldn’t shock a fifth-grader.

Jane

GAINESVILLE, Ga. — She could not abide being referred to as a “mother-in-law.” Perhaps she’d heard too many jokes by too many now long-dead comedians, of the genre that appeared regularly on the Ed Sullivan Show. Naturally I honored her wishes: she would be introduced as “Amy’s mother.” Her two daughters-in-law would follow the same linguistic protocol, so she was “Mike’s mother” and “Chris’s mom.”

New leadership faces old challenges

Baseball legend Yogi Berra once quipped, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” With the welcomed arrival of newly appointed Pine Bluff School District Superintendent C. Michael Robinson, we can’t help but feel like we’ve been here before.