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Steve Chapman


Ferguson shows blacks live in a different America

Fifty years ago this summer, President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. Back then, it was reasonable to expect that by 2014, America would be a fully integrated nation in which equality prevailed. But as the events in Ferguson, Mo., dramatize, the country still resembles what a presidential commission described in 1968: “two societies, one black, one white — separate and unequal.”

Immigrant kids and the fear of disease

In 1952, Sen. Patrick McCarran of Nevada took the Senate floor to warn of the dangers posed by foreigners. The immigration system, he said, is a stream that flows into our society, and “if that stream is polluted our institutions and our way of life becomes infected.” He was not the last person to see those migrating here as a terrifying source of contamination.

The real failures of immigration policy

In the eyes of Texas Gov. Rick Perry and others, the crisis on our southern border demonstrates the failure of our immigration policy. They are correct, though not in the way they think. The failure in our immigration policy comes from the persistent belief that we can make rivers run uphill.

Secrecy, the no-fly list and concealed weapons

It’s a classic Orwellian nightmare: The government decides to deny you a right it extends to other people, but it won’t tell you why and it won’t tell you what you can do about it. You’re stuck in purgatory, effectively convicted without being tried — or even being told the charge against you.

When kids show up at our borders

An undocumented foreigner crossed the Rio Grande near Hidalgo, Texas, the other day. He had spent three weeks traveling from Honduras, and he was carrying only one thing with him: a birth certificate. He was hoping to find relatives in San Antonio or Maryland. His name is Alejandro, and he’s 8 years old.

The real meaning of the Hobby Lobby decision

Organizations concerned with public policy have a habit of hyping developments that relate to their concerns. When the Supreme Court ruled that some corporations are exempt from paying for employees’ contraceptive coverage under Obamacare, both sides loudly trumpeted its importance.

Obama likes secrets, including yours

The surprising thing about the Supreme Court’s decision on police searches of cellphones was its unanimity. Aligned on the same side of a major law enforcement issue were liberal and conservative justices who normally fight like cats and dogs. All agreed that it’s intolerable to let cops ransack the voluminous contents of mobile phones.

Iraq and the echoes of Vietnam

A corrupt government that has alienated many of its people finds itself unable to overcome a growing insurgency in an endless civil war and expects a superpower on the other side of the globe to come to its rescue. That’s the story in Iraq today — which carries eerie echoes of the not-so-distant past.

Obama’s deficient student loan plan

The government normally doesn’t care whether you or I accumulate large bills for home improvement, a new car or exotic vacations. But Barack Obama feels no hesitation in concluding that the cost of higher education has placed “too big a debt load on too many young people.” Therefore, something must be done.

Americans are not serious about government debt

The gross U.S. government debt now stands at $17 trillion, more than double what it was a decade ago. It’s still expanding, as the Treasury pays out more than it takes in, and the shortfall is expected to grow over the next decade. So it’s deeply gratifying to learn that Americans are “highly concerned” about the problem.

What went wrong in Iraq

When the United States invaded Iraq in March 2003, Americans were told it would be a quick, simple project. When asked how long the war might last, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said airily, “Six days, six weeks, I doubt six months.”

Obama’s conservative foreign policy

Conservatives generally agree on a few propositions. The federal government should avoid spending money unnecessarily. It shouldn’t exceed its basic constitutional duties. It should encourage self-reliance rather than dependency. It should accept that some problems are beyond its ability to solve.

Obama’s conservative foreign policy

Conservatives generally agree on a few propositions. The federal government should avoid spending money unnecessarily. It shouldn’t exceed its basic constitutional duties. It should encourage self-reliance rather than dependency. It should accept that some problems are beyond its ability to solve.

Twilight for Obama

About now, Barack Obama may be wondering why he thought it would be such fun to serve a second term rather than go lounge on a beach in Hawaii. Life in the White House has become a daily ordeal of pain and frustration. Nothing is going well.

The FBI prospers by feeding fears

James Comey became FBI director last year, at a time when Osama bin Laden was dead, terrorism at home was on the decline and the United States was shrinking its inflammatory presence in the Muslim world. So naturally, he says the danger is way worse than you think.

FBI prospers by feeding fears

James Comey became FBI director last year, at a time when Osama bin Laden was dead, terrorism at home was on the decline and the United States was shrinking its inflammatory presence in the Muslim world. So naturally, he says the danger is way worse than you think.

Don’t silence graduation speakers

“Oh, that my enemy would write a book,” goes the old wish, coined by someone who knew there is no better way to expose fools than through their own words. It’s an idea that deserves consideration from the college students and faculty unhappy with their schools’ choice in commencement speakers.