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Steve and Cokie Roberts


What would Jesus say?

Conservatives are quick to embrace religious figures who agree with them on issues like abortion, same-sex marriage, and the right of business owners to deny contraception coverage to their employees.

One small blow against gridlock

There’s nothing new about politicians using their offices to enhance their power. The word “gerrymander” was coined in 1812 after Massachusetts Gov. Elbridge Gerry signed a bill creating a legislative district that resembled a salamander.

Failing the test on basic economics

Here’s a quiz: Which politician favors reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank, which aids American companies that compete in world markets and last year helped support $37 billion in exports and 205,000 domestic jobs while actually turning a profit?

Facing facts on immigration

Rupert Murdoch and Sheldon Adelson are both staunch Republicans. Both are also very practical businessmen — Murdoch owns media companies; Adelson, casinos. They became billionaires by dealing with reality, with hard-learned facts — not soft-headed illusions.

Yesterday’s gone

As Hillary Clinton prepares to run for president, she should remember the words of her husband’s campaign theme song in 1992: “Don’t Stop” by Fleetwood Mac.

The pictures on the mantelpiece

Sen. Frank Lautenberg died last year at 89 — an unremarkable event, except for one thing. The New Jersey Democrat was the last surviving World War II veteran in the Senate. Only two remaining House members, John Dingell of Michigan and Ralph Hall of Texas, served during that war, and both are leaving Congress at the end of this year.

Making hard choices

Speaker John Boehner talks a good game about pushing immigration reform. He told a recent fundraiser in Las Vegas that he was “hell-bent on getting this done this year,” reports the Wall Street Journal. And back home in Cincinnati, he even mocked his fellow House Republicans for failing to confront the issue.

A lifetime of difference

It’s graduation week at George Washington University, where Steve has taught for the last 23 years. After the final exam in his class, a student quietly handed him a note that read in part: “You have believed in me since the beginning and told me not to sell myself short, and for that I am grateful.”

Make the bully sweat

Secretary of State John Kerry recently urged Russian leader Vladimir Putin to dial down the confrontation in Ukraine. “If Russia continues in this direction,” Kerry warned, “it will not just be a grave mistake, it will be an expensive mistake.”

The fiddler is still on the roof

The New York Times ran this dispatch from the Ukrainian city of Donetsk: “Worshippers at the Bet Menakhem-Mendl synagogue … confronted a horrifying scene as they left a Passover service this week: masked men on a sidewalk handing out leaflets demanding that Jews register and pay a fine or leave the area, witnesses said.”

The election is not quite over

Democrats are reeling. They’re playing defense, not offense. Their loss in a Florida election for a vacant House seat — in a district President Obama carried twice — was a devastating blow. As Robert Gibbs, the president’s former spokesman, admitted on NBC’s “Meet the Press:” “There’s a real, real danger that Democrats could suffer big losses” this fall.

Pragmatists, purists and power

PAWLEYS ISLAND, S.C. — On one side are the pragmatists: Republicans who want to be part of the governing process and accept compromise as the price of participation. On the other are the purists, who prefer playing gadfly to governing and equate compromise with betrayal.

Maps versus markets

The crisis in Ukraine highlights two truths about international politics: Some things have not changed since the end of the Cold War. And some things have changed a lot.

An outbreak of sanity

Reports by presidential commissions are often like those statues that dominate public squares in Washington: massive in size, but opaque in origin and quickly obscured by a thick layer of grime.

The hand over the lens

The top Super Bowl highlight was not Peyton Manning struggling or Renee Fleming singing or even that adorable puppy nuzzling a horse in the Budweiser commercial. It was Bill O’Reilly grilling Barack Obama.

How dumb is that?

Rick Snyder knows how the economy works. He was a top executive for the computer maker Gateway before heading a venture capital firm that invested in startup companies.

Making the case for free trade

President Obama intends to make free trade a major goal this year, and few policies would do more to stimulate growth and create jobs at a time when too many Americans are still struggling to find work and support their families.