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Christopher Lawrence


Spray painting de Tocqueville

The Internet has been described as a kind of “great equalizer” in that it holds the power to give otherwise voiceless masses a platform for public opinion. I tend to regard this sentiment the same way I think about nuclear power plants: they’re a great way to make a lot of electricity, unless something goes wrong; and if it should go wrong, then it’s going to be very bad.

Peace on earth, good will to men

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) composed the words to one of my favorite Christmas carols, “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” on Dec. 25, 1864. This carol was originally a poem entitled, “Christmas Bells,” which reflected Longfellow’s despair and grief during the years of the American Civil War and his confident hope of peace.

Will we see Jesus at Christmas?

Beginning as a young child, I remember many of the men in our small town, my father included, getting together around Christmas to buy groceries and wrapped gifts for families less fortunate, widows, and our local orphanage.

Nelson Mandela was at his core a freedom fighter

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela is being cast as a regal, gentle giant who used a humble, quiet disposition to put his critics at ease and usher in democratic rule in South Africa, all while keeping blacks, wanting retribution, and whites, fearing their demise, from engaging in a deadly clash that could have torn the nation apart.

God's Benefit Package

Psalm 103:1-2 tells us, “Praise the Lord, my soul; all my inmost being, praise his holy name. Praise the Lord, my soul, and forget not all his benefits.” That’s a good reminder for me since I sometimes have problems remembering things. We should praise the Lord with our soul (our thoughts, actions, plans, dreams, etc.) and don’t forget all His benefits.

Movie Review - 'Out of the Furnace'

Shortly after announcing to the world that they’re expecting a baby, a couple of teens are sent to kill each other, as well as a beloved 80-year-old woman and other national heroes, all to distract and entertain the oppressed, disenfranchised masses.

Toxic in nation's capitol

The Friday following Thanksgiving — a slow news day, no deadlines looming; my wife out of town and the kids and the grands all occupied with whatever. So, with some time on my hands, I thought to begin the Christmas season with a long overdue call to an old friend in the nation’s capitol.

Our own slippery slope?

Even under the most ideal circumstances, policing and other aspects of the administration of justice in the United States can be characterized as hard work and a high-wire balancing act conducted on land. It involves the attempt by justice system officials to protect the lives and property of the broader public while simultaneously assuring that those individuals who threaten those lives and possessions are also afforded the protections of our laws and Constitution. Achieving that delicate balance is made all the more difficult when attempted on a slippery slope.

The tradition of Little Rock Hog games

Growing up in Arkansas, it was a given that I would be a Razorback fan. Although my parents are from Georgia, they moved to Fayetteville to work at the University of Arkansas for Campus Crusade for Christ after they graduated from college. By the time I was born they had transferred to Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, but calling the Hogs was already a family tradition.

An Advent reflection

“Judge not, that ye be not judged. For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?” [Matt. 7:1-3, KJV]

Fallout from the nuclear option

J. Harvie Wilkinson III is a federal circuit court judge, appointed in 1984 by Ronald Reagan, but he’s never seen himself as a doctrinaire conservative trying to “storm the barricades.” After Senate Democrats recently invoked the “nuclear option” and voted to ban filibusters for most presidential nominations, he outlined the consequences of that rash and regrettable action in The Washington Post:

Dardanelle High beats the state

DARDANELLE – In a superintendent’s office built sometime in the 1930s, school administrators are explaining how Dardanelle High beats — in biology, almost doubles — the state average on high school end-of-course exams.

Every day should be a day of thanksgiving

One of the first recorded Thanksgiving Day observances in North America was held in Newfoundland in 1578 by Sir Martin Frobisher of the Frobisher Expedition to find the Northwest Passage. Another early thanksgiving observance was led by Captain John Woodlief on Dec. 4, 1619, who instructed that the day of his ship’s arrival “be yearly and perpetually kept holy as a day of thanksgiving to almighty God.”